Milan Kundera's New Novel in 13 Years

Milan Kundera in 2010. Photograph: Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images
Milan Kundera in 2010. Photograph: Miguel Medina/AFP/Getty Images

Milan Kundera’s New novel The Feast of Insignificance is a “wryly comic yet deeply serious glance at the ultimate insignificance of life and politics, told through the daily lives of four friends in modern-day Paris”. Said chief executive Stephen Page: “It feels incredibly relevant to the world we live in now. It’s very funny, and also quite surreal … It’s hard with an author of Kundera’s stature to talk about his best work, but this is a significant novel, an important work.”

Born in 1929 in Brno, Czechoslovakia, Kundera has now lived in France for more than 40 years. He has won acclaim for novels including The Joke (1967), The Unbearable Lightness of Being (1984) – “Kundera’s novel seems as relevant now as it did when it was first published,” wrote John Banville in 2004 – and Immortality (1991), which were all originally released in Czech. His 1984 play Jacques and His Master, and later novels, including Ignorance (2002), were written in French.

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French version’s publication link